Friday, May 15, 2015

Eponiad (D&D 5e creature)

No. Appearing: 1 - 15 (2d8-1)

Mysterious creatures that blur the line between fey and elementals, eponiads are wondrous horses made of living stone and metal. They mix freely with pegasi and unicorns in sylvan settings, sharing a common empathy born from their equine nature. On the Elemental Plane of Earth, they are sometimes enslaved by dao (though the dao insist they are merely “domesticated”), while on the Prime Material Plane eponiads occasionally befriend hill dwarves and gnomes.

Eponiads appear as powerful, muscular draft horses and ponies formed from stone and metal. They show as much variety in composition as normal horses do in coat and markings; one eponiad might be uniformly made of pink granite with eyes of turquoise while another might be bronze with a jade blaze on its forehead. Regardless of their apparent composition, all eponiads display similar durability and strength.

Eponiad
Large elemental, chaotic good

Armor Class: 18 (natural armor)
Hit Points: 73 (7d10 + 35)
Speed: 50 ft., burrow 50 ft.

STR 20 (+5), DEX 10 (+0), CON 20 (+5), INT 10 (+0), WIS 15 (+2), CHA 13 (+1)

Damage Vulnerabilities: acid, thunder
Damage Resistances: bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing from nonmagical weapons
Damage Immunities: poison
Condition Immunities: exhaustion, paralyzed, petrified, poisoned, unconscious
Senses: darkvision 60 ft., tremorsense 60 ft., passive Perception 12
Languages: Understands Celestial, Sylvan, and Terran but can’t speak in a manner intelligible to humanoids. Some rare eponiads understand Gnomish.
Challenge: 3 (700 XP)

Earth Glide. The eponiad can burrow through nonmagical, unworked earth and stone. While doing so, the eponiad doesn’t disturb the material it moves through. The eponiad can willingly extend its earth glide ability to a single rider.

Actions
Hooves. Melee Weapon Attack: +7 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 12 (2d6 + 5) bludgeoning damage.

No comments:

Post a Comment

JUSTICE LEAGUE is the Movie the Rest of You Wanted

If I was a Warner Brothers exec right now, I’d have to conclude that the problem with Justice League is that it wasn’t dark enough. Aft...